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It was getting alarmingly late on an early summer afternoon. While madly scrambling in front of a laptop screen to get an interview with Flea founder Eric Demby posted before racing out to seek adventure on a bucolic summer’s eve, it happened. The pleasingly narcotic background drone of National Public Radio snapped into sharp, amplified focus. Someone, on the radio, was talking about seasonal soda. Seasonal soda in Brooklyn.

Antonio Ramos and Caroline Mak of Brooklyn Soda Works, in studio at NPR.

What’s this!? ‘This,’ turned out to be Amy Eddings, local host of NPR’s All Things Considered, setting up an interview for her weekly ‘Last Chance Foods’ segment with Antonio Ramos and Caroline Mak of Brooklyn Soda Works – the Brooklyn Flea-based vendors of seasonal, and yes, even foraged, sodas made with fresh locally-sourced ingredients.

The interview went on to delve into the mayoral ban on giant sodas:

Amy: So how big are your sodas? Are they going to pass muster with Mayor Bloomberg if this ban goes through?

Antonio: I think we’ll be ok. Our typical serving is twelve ounces.

Amy: So it must seem very small to Big Gulp fans.

The foraged soda project:

Amy (sounding alarmed): “Foraged sodas!? OK. Now you’re getting really artisanal and funky.”

And the inevitable dead horse:

Amy: Have we jumped the shark on artisanal foods at this point?

Antonio: No, I don’t think there’s a shark to jump…People love food. They’re obsessed with food. And people have always been trying to make better foods…I think the desire to eat good food and to make good food is always going to be there.

Here’s the full interview:

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